Short Eared Owl in flight 

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The short-eared owl occurs on all continents except Antarctica and Australia. It is partially migratory, moving south in winter.

The short-eared owl  is a species of typical owl . 

known as the eared owls, as they have tufts of feathers resembling mammalian ears. These “ear” tufts may or may not be visible.

A medium-sized owl measuring 34–43 cm in length and weighing 206–475 g. It has large eyes, a big head, a short neck, and broad wings.Its bill is short, strong, hooked and black. Plumage is mottled tawny to brown with a barred tail and wings.

Behaviour

It will also wander nomadically in search of better food supplies during years when vole populations are low.

Hunting occurs mostly at night, Its daylight hunting seems to coincide with the high-activity periods of voles, its preferred prey.

Several owls may hunt over the same open area.

 

Juvenile Little Owl

juvenile little owl

juvenile little owl photo available to download for personal usage . For example phone wall paper, computer desk top image , small print.  The file download can be purchased at the bottom of the page for only £14.00 and comes in a file size of 30cm by 20cm (without a watermark) .

Little Owl were introduced to the Uk in the 19th century and are now widespread in Europe.

The little owl is small and chunky measuring roughly 21 cm in height.

They can be seen in the daylight, usually perching on a tree branch, telegraph pole or rock.

In flight it has long, rounded wings, rapid wing beats and flies with a slight undulation.

Breeding Bird Survey data suggest that little owl numbers are declining, with the UK population estimated to be down by 24 per cent between 1995 and 2008

This particular little owl is this years young adults nest  in a old unused barn.

Grey Heron in Flight

Grey Heron in flight

Grey Heron in Flight – Photo available to download for personal usage . For example phone wall paper, computer desk top image , small print.  The file download can be purchased at the bottom of the page for only £14.00 and comes in a file size of 30cm by 20cm (without a watermark) .

Grey Heron – Scientific name: Ardea cinerea

Grey Herons are  tall with long legs a long beak and grey black and white feathering.

They can stand with their neck stretched out looking for food or hunched down with their neck bent over their chest.

Feeding on lots of fish, but also small birds such as ducklings, small mammals like voles and amphibians. After harvesting, grey herons can sometimes be seen in fields, looking for rodents.

Fallow Stag with Oak

Fallow Stag with Oak – Photo available to download for personal usage . For example phone wall paper, computer desk top image , small print.  The file download can be purchased at the bottom of the page for only £14.00 and comes in a file size of 30cm by 20cm (without a watermark) .

The fallow deer is a ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae.

This species is native to Europe and can be seen in different colour variations such as cream, brown, black and white.

Appearance

Adult male fallow deer  are generally 84 – 94 cm at the shoulder and weigh 46 – 94kg.

Females (does) are 73 – 91cm at the shoulder and weigh 35 – 56kg. This places them in size between roe and red deer.

Behaviour

Stags maintain a traditional, defended rutting stand to attract sufficient does to herd them into a harem. During the rut bucks groan tremendously and does with fawns give a short bark when alarmed.

After mating, adult does give birth to a single fawn in June or July after a gestation of 229 days. Stags generally live for 8 – 10 years although they can live as long as 16 years. 

 

Female Kestrel Portrait

Female Kestrel Portrait – photo available to download for personal usage . For example phone wall paper, computer desk top image , small print.  The file download can be purchased at the bottom of the page for only £14.00 and comes in a file size of 30cm by 20cm (without a watermark) .

Kestrel – Scientific name: Falco tinnunculus

Kestrels are birds of prey which are  found in a wide variety of habitats. From moor and heath, to farmland and urban areas.

The only places they do not favour are dense forests, vast treeless wetlands and mountains. They are a familiar sight, hovering beside a motorway or other main road and can often be seen perched on a high tree branch, or on a telephone post or wire, on the look out for prey.

They have adapted readily to man-made environments and can survive right in the center of cities.

Adult Little Owl

Adult Little Owl

Adult Little Owl photo available to download for personal usage . For example phone wall paper, computer desk top image , small print.  The file download can be purchased at the bottom of the page for only £14.00 and comes in a file size of 30cm by 20cm (without a watermark) .

Little Owl were introduced to the Uk in the 19th century and are now widespread in Europe.

The little owl is small and chunky measuring roughly 21 cm in height.

They can be seen in the daylight, usually perching on a tree branch, telegraph pole or rock.

In flight it has long, rounded wings, rapid wing beats and flies with a slight undulation.

Breeding Bird Survey data suggest that little owl numbers are declining, with the UK population estimated to be down by 24 per cent between 1995 and 2008

This particular little owl nests in a old unused barn.

Male Kingfisher Portrait

Male Kingfisher

Male Kingfisher Portrait  photo available to download for personal usage . For example phone wall paper, computer desk top image , small print.  The file download can be purchased at the bottom of the page for only £14.00 and comes in a file size of 30cm by 20cm (without a watermark) .

Widely distributed over Europe, Asia, and North Africa . Migrates from areas where rivers freeze in winter.

Kingfisher are small  bright blue and orange birds of slow moving or still water.

Feeding by flying rapidly, low over water.  Hunting for fish from riverside perches, hovering above the water’s surface.

Important members of ecosystems and good indicators of freshwater community health.

Breeding

Common kingfishers are highly territorial,  and must eat around 60% of its body weight each day. so it is essential to have control of a suitable stretch of river.

Solitary for most of the year, roosting alone in heavy cover. 

Courtship is initiated by the male chasing the female while calling continually, and later by ritual feeding, with copulation usually following.

Nests are  excavated by both birds of the pair in a low vertical riverbank.

kingfisher typically lays two to ten glossy white eggs

Both sexes incubate by day, but only the female at night.

The eggs hatch in 19–20 days, and the altricial young are in the nest for a further 24–25 days, often more.

Survival

When Juveniles are large enough,  the young birds will come to the burrow entrance to be fed.

The early days for fledged juveniles are more hazardous. During its first dives into water, about four days after leaving the nest, a fledgling may become waterlogged and drown.

Very vulnerable to hard winters and habitat degradation through pollution or unsympathetic management of watercourses. Kingfishers are amber listed because of their unfavourable conservation status in Europe.

Listed as a Schedule 1 species under the Wildlife and Countryside Act offering them additional protection.

Female Stonechat

Female Stonechat 

Female stonechat 

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Stonechat – scientific name: Saxicola rubicola

Stonechats are robin sized birds. Males have striking black heads with white around the side of their neck, orange-red breasts and a mottled brown back.

Females lack the male’s black head, but have brown backs and an orange tinge to their chests. Birds are frequently seen flicking their wings while perched, often doing so on the tops of low bushes. As its name suggests, birds utter a sharp loud call that sound like two stones being tapped together. They breed in western and southern parts of the UK, but disperse more widely in winter.

 

 

Seal in the waves

Seal in the waves

A seal just come in from the sea.

Photo available to download for personal usage . For example phone wall paper, computer desk top image , small print.  The file download can be purchased at the bottom of the page for only £14.00 and comes in a file size of 30cm by 20cm (without a watermark) .

Seals are found all around the coastline of the British Isles, The highest populations are found around Scotland and along the eastern coast of England.

They can also be found throughout the colder waters of Northern Europe.

 Non-migratory animals which spend their lives close to the shore, rarely venturing more than a few miles out to sea. 

Seals live in large groups and can make their home on a variety of different shorelines

What they eat

feed on fish, but also eat squids, whelks, crabs and mussels.

The young are born during the summer.

Doe on the run

Doe on the run

A female (doe) deer running across a field.

Photo available to download for personal usage . For example phone wall paper, computer desk top image , small print.  The file download can be purchased at the bottom of the page for only £14.00 and comes in a file size of 30cm by 20cm (without a watermark) .

The fallow deer is a ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae.

This species is native to Europe and can be seen in different colour variations such as cream, brown, black and white.

Appearance

Adult male fallow deer  are generally 84 – 94 cm at the shoulder and weigh 46 – 94kg.

Females (does) are 73 – 91cm at the shoulder and weigh 35 – 56kg. This places them in size between roe and red deer.

Behaviour

Stags maintain a traditional, defended rutting stand to attract sufficient does to herd them into a harem. During the rut bucks groan tremendously and does with fawns give a short bark when alarmed.

After mating, adult does give birth to a single fawn in June or July after a gestation of 229 days. Stags generally live for 8 – 10 years although they can live as long as 16 years.